The Strand Theatre – 9th & Spring St.

The Strand Theatre
1934
The Strand Theatre
Opening Night February 21, 1920
The Strand Theatre
1924

Located at the corner of NE 9th Street & Spring Street. The Strand Theatre was opened February 21, 1920. By 1941 it was owned and operated by Goldman Theatres of Philadelphia. It was a fairly large theatre with a balcony, and had a huge wrap-around neon lit marquee. For years it was a neighborhood double feature second run house.

In around 1968, Goldman began to program first run features. In 1970, the Strand Theatre was badly damaged in a fire, which occurred around the same time as a fire which destroyed the Embassy Theatre in downtown Reading. The fire at the Strand Theatre was set by three kids, and it possibly never reopened. In 1972 the property was sold to Budco, however, it was torn down and replaced by a restaurant. – Cinema Treasures

The Stand Theatre
1970s Fire – photo by Reading PA Fire
The Stand Theatre
1970s Fire – photo by Reading PA Fire

Born and raised in Berks, I am fascinated by the style, design & culture of the mid-late 20th century. I started this website to research and build a collection of the places, things and stories I have heard about my entire life. Read more here.

6 Replies to “The Strand Theatre – 9th & Spring St.”

  1. The last movie I saw there was The Day of the Triffids. It was a British horror film and it scared the living daylights out of me. Years later I saw the movie on TV – not scary at all.

  2. I remember it well! That was the only movie theater I knew as a kid. I grew up in NW Reading and saw a lot of movies there. I didn’t remember what happened to it only that I was disappointed to see a McDonalds in its place at some point.

  3. The Strand was within walking distance from my house. My dad knew the owner. I could get in movies for free. It was great. My favorite movie I went to was “Wait Until Dark”. Loved it.

  4. My parents had friends who lived on Moss street. When I was a kid, maybe 7 or 8 years old sometime in the early 1970s, we were visiting those people and we walked over the Strand after it had burned. I remember how creepy it was. I’m pretty sure my dad’s friend embellished the story of the fire by telling me someone died in there. Perhaps someone did; I can’t remember. I sort of remember lots of broken glass or mirror. I think maybe there were columns that were covered with the little square mirrors and most of them were broken and crushed on the sidewalk..

  5. We lived in the 1400 block of Birch Street in the early 1950s, and I walked to the Strand nearly every Saturday to watch whatever was playing. The flicks started around 1:00 and lasted until 4:30. All for about a quarter. There were cartoons, a serial, and a feature. There were always a lot of kids on a Saturday afternoon and sometimes a few of them got a little rowdy. The ushers usually tossed those guys from the theater! I saw my share of horror films over the years and was scared on all occasions, but the one movie that has stuck with me was a drama about the smoke jumpers of the US Forest Service called “Red Skies of Montana” (1952). With reference to the outside picture of the fire, I recognized the Marion Fire Company’s 85’ ladder truck on the far right of the picture. The Marions were most likely the first on the scene as they were only a few blocks away.

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